The Role Of Education In Connecting Food With Fashion

Arantza Vilas Monday, 1 March 2021

This is a 23 minute lesson. Textile artist and designer Arantza Vilas, founder of Pinaki Studios, introduces the ways in which she connects food with textiles through utilising food waste, collaborating with chefs, and experimenting with materials. The role of education - both via means of research and play - comes to the fore as Arantza explains her background. 


In this Lesson you will learn:

  • About textile artist and designer Arantza Vilas's utilisation of food waste in her practice
  • How food can be applied to create natural dyes
  • Educational approaches around the subject of food waste and how it connects to fashion and design

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