Research And Development For Film And TV Sets And Costumes

Arantza Vilas Wednesday, 1 December 2021

This is a 23 minute lesson. Textile artist and designer Arantza Vilas, founder of Pinaki Studios, explains how to research textiles for modern film and TV. She introduces projects that explore our connection and familiarity with textiles that will build an authentic picture, while allowing for experimentation into innovative textile techniques and materials. Here we understand how the film and TV industry needs to both limit and utilise waste.

If you are wanting to create interior products or dress sets, tune into this Lesson for an understanding of where your responsible business practices and creativity could move this industry forward.

Thumbnail: Musketeers


In this Lesson you will learn:

  • About Pinaki Studios 
  • Methods of exploring ideas and making connections for collaborative work
  • The importance of the history of materials, and how this can shape the future of those materials
  • The current film costume industry in terms of sustainability
  • The importance of storytelling and tactility in interior surfaces

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